FAQ's

FAQ Categories

General

What should I use to clean my baby's teeth?

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?

What is the difference between a pediatric dentist and a family dentist?

How do I find a pediatric dentist in my hometown?

Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

What should I do if my child has a toothache?

Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child's teeth?

How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?

How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?

Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?

How do I make my child's diet safe for his teeth?

How do dental sealants work?

How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?

What can I do to protect my child's teeth during sporting events?

What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?

How safe are dental X-rays?

How can parents help prevent tooth decay?

What is the best toothbrush for kids 9-13? Do you recommend the Sonic?

Do you have cosmetic dentistry practicioner on staff? If not can you refer one that accepts insurance?

Coding

What is CDT-200X?

Is the D1120 Prophylaxis Code Applicable to All Types of Prophylaxes?

Is There a Separate Code for a Difficult Prophylaxis?

What is the Code for Fluoride Varnish?

Is there a dental code for an interim therapeutic restoration?

What Code should be used to report an evaluation on a very young child?

We extracted a supernumerary tooth between #8 and #9on an 8-year-old child. Could you please let us know how we should bill this? We know the CDT code (D7140) but do not know what tooth number to report.

What states currently have non-covered procedures legislation?

PAC

Why was the AAPD Political Action Committee formed?

What is the purpose of the AAPD PAC?

How will candidates for office be selected for AAPD PAC support?

Specifically, what actions would be necessary for a candidate to be a likely recipient for AAPD PAC support?

Who will make the final decision on which candidates receive AAPD PAC funds?

How can AAPD members participate in recommending candidates for support?

What is the governance and structure of the AAPD PAC Steering Committee?

Are contributions to the AAPD PAC tax deductible?

What is the difference between "hard" and "soft" dollar contributions to the AAPD PAC?

How much can I contribute to the AAPD PAC each year?

How much can I contribute directly to an individual Congressional candidate committee for each election?

Questions And Answers

General

What should I use to clean my baby's teeth?

A toothbrush will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay. Any soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head, preferably one designed specifically for infants, should be used at least once a day at bedtime.
More: Dental Care For Your Baby

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When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?

In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday.

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What is the difference between a pediatric dentist and a family dentist?

Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.
More: The Pediatric Dentist

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How do I find a pediatric dentist in my hometown?

Click on the Find A Pediatric Dentist button located above. Enter your city, state and zip for a list of pediatric dentists nearest you. If your entries result in "no matching pediatric dentist records were found," broaden your search by entering the state only or nearest city and state.

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Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

Primary, or "baby," teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.
More: The Pediatric Dentist

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What should I do if my child has a toothache?

First, rinse the irritated area with warm salt water and place a cold compress on the face if it is swollen. Give the child acetaminophen for any pain, rather than placing aspirin on the teeth or gums. Finally, see a dentist as soon as possible.
More: Emergency Dental Care

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Are thumbsucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child's teeth?

Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.
More: Thumb, Finger and Pacifier Habits

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How can I prevent decay caused by nursing?

Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child's teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child's first birthday.
More: Dental Care For Your Baby

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How often does my child need to see the pediatric dentist?

A check-up every six months is recommended in order prevent cavities and other dental problems. However, your pediatric dentist can tell you when and how often your child should visit based on their personal oral health.
More: Regular Dental Visits

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Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?

The sooner the better! Starting at birth, clean your child’s gums with a soft infant toothbrush or cloth and water. Parents should use a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste to brush baby teeth twice daily as soon as they erupt and a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush. Once children are 3 to 6 years old, then the amount should be increased to a pea-size dollop and perform or assist your child’s toothbrushing. Remember that young children do not have the ability to brush their teeth effectively.  Children should spit out and not swallow excess toothpaste after brushing. 
More:Enamel Fluorosis

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How do I make my child's diet safe for his teeth?

Make sure your child has a balanced diet, including one serving each of: fruits and vegetables, breads and cereals, milk and dairy products, and meat fish and eggs. Limiting the servings of sugars and starches will also aid in protecting your child's teeth from decay. You can also ask your pediatric dentist to help you select foods that protect your children's teeth.
More: Diet and Dental Health

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How do dental sealants work?

Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.
More: Sealants

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How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?

Have your pediatric dentist evaluate the fluoride level of your child's primary source of drinking water. If your child is not getting enough fluoride internally through water (especially if the fluoride level is deficient or if your child drinks bottled water without fluoride), then your pediatric dentist may prescribe fluoride supplements.
More: Enamel Fluorosis

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What can I do to protect my child's teeth during sporting events?

Soft plastic mouthguards can be used to protect a child's teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sport related injuries. A custom-fitted mouthguard developed by a pediatric dentist will protect your child from injuries to the teeth, face and even provide protection from severe injuries to the head.
More: Mouth Protectors

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What should I do if my child falls and knocks out a permanent tooth?

The most important thing to do is to remain calm. Then find the tooth. Hold it by the crown rather than the root and try to reinsert it in the socket. If that is not possible, put the tooth in a glass of milk and take your child and the glass immediately to the pediatric dentist.
More: Emergency Dental Care

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How safe are dental X-rays?

There is very little risk in dental X-rays. Pediatric dentists are especially careful to limit the amount of radiation to which children are exposed. Lead aprons and high-speed film are used to ensure safety and minimize the amount of radiation.
More: X-Ray Use and Safety

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How can parents help prevent tooth decay?

Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.
More: Preventive Dentistry

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What is the best toothbrush for kids 9-13? Do you recommend the Sonic?

By the time your child reaches 9-10 years old, many adult teeth are now present and an adult toothbrush/toothpaste can be used. Any soft-bristled toothbrush should be used two times a day for two minutes.
 
Please visit http://mouthmonsters.mychildrensteeth.org/tips-for-parents/ for oral health tips for parents and caregivers.
 
 

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Do you have cosmetic dentistry practicioner on staff? If not can you refer one that accepts insurance?

 Hello,
 
We are a member organization, so there are actually no dentists on staff at our office in chicago. If you would like to find a dentist in your area, please go to http://www.aapd.org/finddentist/search/ from there you should be able to find a dentist in your area and info about contacting them regarding insurance. 
 
thank you, 
 
Lily Snyder

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Coding

What is CDT-200X?

CDT-200X (X = year) is the most recent edition of Current Dental Terminology (CDT), which contains the version of the Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature (the Code) that is effective for services provided on or after January 1, of every year. The Code has been designated as the national standard for reporting dental services by the Federal Government under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and is recognized by third-party payers nationwide. All code terminology is Copyright© of the American Dental Association.

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Is the D1120 Prophylaxis Code Applicable to All Types of Prophylaxes?

AAPD analysis: Past versions of this code left some confusion as to whether a toothbrush prophylaxis was included under this code number. The definition of prophylaxis was changed for CDT-2005 so that the physical method of removing plaque is not specified, which should satisfy third-party carriers. While cleaning is described as the removal of plaque, stain and calcified deposits from the dentition, CDT does not specify the method for accomplishing this task. Therefore, a toothbrush, rubber cup or cavitron prophylaxis or any other specific means of accomplishing the cleaning are all considered prophylaxes. This is intentionally left to the best judgment of the practitioner.

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Is There a Separate Code for a Difficult Prophylaxis?

YES. As of 2017, there is a new code D4346 for scaling in presence of generalized moderate or severe gingival inflammation – full mouth, after evaluation. For more information on this new code visit here.

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What is the Code for Fluoride Varnish?

AAPD analysis: When fluoride varnish is used as part of a preventive treatment protocol for patients, D1206 is reported for children and adults.

Current for CDT 2015
D1206 - topical application of fluoride varnish
D1208 - topical application of fluoride - excluding varnish

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Is there a dental code for an interim therapeutic restoration?

Yes. Code D2941 interim therapeutic restoration - primary dentition. 

Placement of an adhesive restorative material following caries debridement by hand or other method for the management of early childhood caries. Not considered a definitive treatment.

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What Code should be used to report an evaluation on a very young child?

AAPD Analysis: Procedure code D0145 - oral evaluation for a patient under three years of age and counseling with primary caregiver.

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We extracted a supernumerary tooth between #8 and #9on an 8-year-old child. Could you please let us know how we should bill this? We know the CDT code (D7140) but do not know what tooth number to report.

AAPD Analysis: Back in January 2003, the American Dental Association introduced a new system for reporting supernumeraries in CDT 4, which explains how to name permanent and primary supernumerary teeth. Supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition are identified by the numbers 51 through 82, beginning with the area of the upper right third molar. A quick way to identify the tooth number is to add the number 50 to the number of the closest permanent tooth. In other words, supernumerary#51 is closest to the upper right molar, which is tooth #1 (1+50=51). Supernumerary#82 is closest to the lower right third molar which is tooth #32 (32+50=82). In the scenario you described, the supernumerary tooth should be reported as tooth #58 or #59, depending on whether it is/was closer to tooth #8 or #9. For primary dentition, supernumerary teeth are identified by adding the letter "S" to the letter that identifies the closest primary tooth. For example, supernumerary tooth "AS" is closest to primary tooth "A," and supernumerary tooth "TS" is closest to primary tooth "T."

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What states currently have non-covered procedures legislation?

Lawmakers in several states have passed new legislation that no longer allows insurers to require dental providers to give discounts for services not covered under an insured dental plan. Listed below are the states that have passed this legislation, and this page lists links to the actual laws.

FeeCappingLegislationMap

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PAC

Why was the AAPD Political Action Committee formed?

The AAPD PAC was formed to provide a vehicle whereby the AAPD can contribute funds to candidates for federal office.

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What is the purpose of the AAPD PAC?

The purpose of the AAPD PAC is to provide financial support to candidates for federal office who have demonstrated a serious commitment to those issues of importance to AAPD and the improved oral health of children.

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How will candidates for office be selected for AAPD PAC support?

An objective ranking process has been developed to evaluate potential recipients for AAPD PAC support to assure that only those candidates who have shown measurably demonstrated actions to improve children’s oral health through the federal legislative or regulatory process will receive support.

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Specifically, what actions would be necessary for a candidate to be a likely recipient for AAPD PAC support?

Introduction of legislation to improve children’s oral health, co-sponsoring legislation, holding hearings on legislation, writing letters to colleagues supporting legislation or regulations, assisting AAPD representatives in networking with other influential legislators and voting favorably on legislation are some of the primary issues addressed in the ranking process.

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Who will make the final decision on which candidates receive AAPD PAC funds?

The final decisions on funding will be made through a collaborative effort by the AAPD Board of Trustees, AAPD PAC Steering Committee, AAPD Council on Government Affairs, AAPD Child Advocate and the AAPD Congressional Liaison.

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How can AAPD members participate in recommending candidates for support?

Any individual AAPD member, state unit or district organization can make recommendations for candidate support through the AAPD headquarters office staff.

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What is the governance and structure of the AAPD PAC Steering Committee?

The officers of the PAC Steering Committee, including a chair, vice-chair, treasurer, assistant treasurer, and secretary, are appointed by the AAPD Board of Trustees. Additionally, each of the six AAPD districts has a representative on the PAC Steering Committee, as appointed by the Board of Trustees.

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Are contributions to the AAPD PAC tax deductible?

As with all political donations, contributions to the AAPD PAC are not tax deductible and must be paid from personal, not corporate, funds in order to be used in direct support of candidates.

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What is the difference between "hard" and "soft" dollar contributions to the AAPD PAC?

Contributions from personal funds are "hard" dollars that the AAPD PAC can spend on candidate support, whereas contributions from corporate funds (such as an AAPD member’s incorporated practice) are "soft" dollars that must be applied to the AAPD PAC’s administrative expenses. In order to maximize the AAPD PAC’s effectiveness, the PAC Steering Committee encourages members to donate from personal funds.

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How much can I contribute to the AAPD PAC each year?

$5,000. See below for a listing of the various AAPD PAC donor recognition levels.

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How much can I contribute directly to an individual Congressional candidate committee for each election?

For for the 2013-14 election cycle the limit is $2,600 per election. Note that the primary and general election each count as separate elections.

Your generous support of this important effort to improve the oral health of children and further issues of importance to the specialty of pediatric dentistry is strongly encouraged.

Federal guidelines require that PAC contributions to be utilized for candidate support come from personal funds. Contributions from corporate entities must be used for administrative purposes.

All PAC contributions will be screened and any from persons outside of the restricted class (i.e., persons not voting members or staff of AAPD) will be returned.

The AAPD PAC Steering Committee has determined various categories of giving, based on an annual cycle of donations. These categories are:

Patriot - $1,000 and above
Cabinet - $500 to $999
Congress - $250 to $499
Ambassador - $100 to $249
Junior Ambassador (Students) - $25

For additional information regarding the AAPD Political Action Committee contact any member of the PAC Steering Committee or AAPD Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel C. Scott Litch at oed@aapd.org.

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